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European countries

The situation in Europe is very similar to the situation in North America. Cases of espionage happen on both sides of the Atlantic, as I will show in section 5.4.

In Britain, for example, there was no legislation before 1994 that prohibited private surveillance and industrial/economic espionage. Under former law, penalties only applied to the theft of government military secrets. After several serious incidents, a new legislation was proposed that would make it an offense to gain information through deception.

France is one of those countries that is said to have a very active intelligence service for economic espionage. The report [6], which was written July 1994, tells about an embarrassing release of information about those activities targeted against American companies. It turned out that the companies responsible for leaking the information were unhappy with the French intelligence service (DGSE). They argued that the DGSE favored some companies in distributing material gained by economic espionage.

The situation in Russia is quite similar. A report ([14]) from 1996 states that Russian President Yeltsin had "ordered top Russian officials to close the technology gap with the West and told them to make better use of industrial intelligence to do so".


next up previous contents
Next: Asian countries Up: Official statements and legal Previous: Canada   Contents
Tim Wellhausen
2000-01-20