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Requirements

The new requirements of the DGSA state that information systems for the DoD must (1) support information processing under multiple security policies of any complexity or type, (2) be sufficiently protected to allow distributed information processing among multiple hosts on multiple networks in accordance with open system architectures, (3) support information processing among users with different security attributes, and (4) be sufficiently protected to allow connectivity via common carrier (public) communications systems. The use of public communication systems is a move away from dedicated circuits. Public networks cannot be controlled by the DoD. Therefore, the only requirement that can be made is availability. To protect the flow of information, the end points of the communication must be under physically and logically control of the DoD. These end systems must be inside a safe and protected environment. The DoD requires that multiple security policies can be applied to protect information of different sensitivity. It must be possible that information objects can be accessed and/or used simultaneously by one or more users based on levels of clearance and access to compartments of information. The DoD has realized that its requirements are not very different from those requirements of commercial organizations. Therefore, implementations should support security policies with respect to confidentiality, integrity, and availability. The words "sufficient protection" are another change in the requirements of the DoD. The DoD used to examine assertions about protection at the time of certification and to assume that the assertions remain true despite changes to critical components. Now, the DoD focuses on risk management and the value of the information to be protected and concentrates on assuring that information remains protected. The DGSA does not specify all details for an implementation. Instead, it establishes the minimum constraints of acceptable implementations by defining an information framework. The design of the operating system's architecture is left to the implementors.
next up previous
Next: Information Domains Up: Feustel, Mayfield: The DGSA: Previous: Feustel, Mayfield: The DGSA:
Tim Wellhausen
2000-01-20